How to use Halloween in your marketing

Hoping for huge sales this Christmas? Then your marketing copy better be ready for Halloween.

Halloween officially marks the start of the spending season. Research by Yesmail Interactive suggests 38% of people start Christmas shopping before November. According to the Daily Mail, 24 October is the day most people start their Christmas shopping. That means many of your customers are thinking about Christmas already – and have been for some time.

Parents are one such category, with half-term holidays at the end of October giving them the opportunity to hit the shops. It’s also the time savvy shoppers start planning for huge retail days, such as Black Friday and Cyber Monday, as an opportunity to buy cut-price Christmas presents early.

But before we get ahead of ourselves, Halloween itself has a lot to offer your business when it comes to marketing. Since this holiday is becoming bigger year on year in the UK, your customers will expect to see you reacting to it. Here are some ways you can use Halloween in your business.

Get creative with Halloween marketing

Halloween provides an opportunity for you to get reacquainted with your products in a unique, distinctive and creative way. Anything which makes you look at your usual wares or services in a new light is a great way to get to know your products’ USPs inside and out and what your customers respond to.

Whether you sell DIY products, bespoke jewellery or kitchen wares, you can market your product for Halloween with just a little thought.

Don’t neglect your visuals too. Why not create a spooky banner for your homepage and email marketing, create a special Halloween page displaying all your themed products, or even set up a promotion for the holiday?

Tap into hashtags

Social media is awash with Halloween-themed stories, posts, news, ideas and more. Get in on the action proving yourself an invaluable tool to your customers.

You can do this by creating a Pinterest site with great tips and advice on costumes, home decorating and recipe ideas. Or feature polls on Twitter to get insight on what your customers are up to and which of your products they like/need/want most. You can even give your Facebook followers #HalloweenTips to get them using your products this Halloween. Some of the best Halloween hashtags are: #HalloweenMakeup #pumpkin #creepy #spooky #monster #costume #zombie #Halloween

You can also tie your Halloween marketing in with autumnal and harvest trends, which is a desirable marketing point if you’re selling things like staycations, family days out, homewares, gourmet foods, DIY and craft supplies. Popular autumn hashtags include: #home #comfort #autumn #fall #outdoors #cosy

Engage your customers

Your customers are busy people – they’re doing a lot this Halloween. Whether they’re going to adult parties, putting together a costume for their little ones, or busy defending themselves against the onslaught of trick or treaters – they know Halloween is coming and they’re all reacting to it differently.

Consider running contests or taking the time to browse through some of your followers’ profiles and see what they’re up to. Asking your community to tweet photos of their Halloween outfits and decorated homes or even asking for their quirky tips on how to deter trick or treaters is a great way to let your customers know you’re interested in them. And if you can throw in a prize too for the best submissions, you’ll endear yourself even more.

Be part of a bigger narrative

Seasonal marketing campaigns don’t have to be separate entities. In fact, your overall aim should be to create a bigger narrative through your seasonal campaigns which unite your business’ ethos.

With Halloween getting bigger every year in the UK, your Halloween campaign is actually the perfect opportunity to kickstart your Christmas campaign, as crazy as that sounds.

Use the sinister side of Halloween to create mystery and initiate a story you will continue to unravel throughout November and December advertisements, print marketing or radio jingles. Narrative works especially well through the medium of copywriting, so hire a copywriter to help you firm up the details.

If you sell toys, perhaps the most wanted children’s toy this Christmas has been stolen by angry witches. Through a gruesome retelling of the Hansel and Gretel story, the children might go in search of the toys to a haunted mansion. With a ‘To be continued’ ending, you can leave the customer in suspense.

As Christmas approaches, pick that story back up. The children are in peril, but perhaps they realise the haunted house is made out of gingerbread? They might rescue the toy and themselves by eating through the house.

All stories have light and dark to them, and most have a happy ending, meaning it’s not too difficult to weave a story through Halloween, ending at Christmas. Your customers will also enjoy the clever technique, feeling that they’re following something through to the end and feel closer to your brand as a result.

Get started on your Halloween marketing copy

It’s not too late to implement some of these Halloween marketing techniques. The easiest and fastest way is to get online and start tweeting your followers. Or if you want to be one step ahead of the holiday next year, remember to schedule a reminder to start working on your Halloween campaign around July.

If you plan in advance, you can hire a copywriter or marketing consultant to help get your campaign in perfect shape so there are no spooky surprises come October.

Advertisements

Write better copy for your business

Whatever your business, you need great copy to sell it. From product descriptions on your online shop to adverts in the local press – well-crafted words are what will get you noticed and get you sales.

The quickest and most effective way to do this is to hire a copywriter. But if you fancy trying your hand, then here are my 7 tips to write better copy for your business.

  1. Sell the experience
    Nowadays we are bombarded with sales messages. If you’re going to make your product irresistible, you need to make sure it is experience-driven. In short, write about the benefits of what your customer will get rather than just the facts, and start with your biggest selling point.
  2. Build a story
    Creating a story helps push your reader along through your copy and builds their engagement with your product. By story, I don’t just mean a fantasy tale. Have a clearly defined beginning, middle and end to your copy (e.g. start with a product’s rich history and end by showing how it is still beneficial to your customer today).
  3. Hook with headlines
    Your headline should be relevant to the text that follows, but it should also be simple. Headings of around 6 words work best and will be fully visible in Google. Great headlines are active, informative and intriguing. Subheadings should be used to break up a lot of text and keep the reader moving through your copy.
  4. Picture perfect
    Images can help clarify a point and they are visually more appealing than a page full of text. But make sure they are relevant in some way and quality (not just clickbait). There are some websites where you can get license-free images (such as Creative Commons) which are not half bad, but if you want more choice then be prepared to pay and head to somewhere like iStock or Shutterstock.
  5. Keep it short and sweet
    There’s no set amount of words that is perfect to hook your reader. Use as many as it takes to sell your message. However, be aware that unless you’re writing about an academic or technical subject, making your content easy to read hinges on shorter sentences (up to around 16 words) with shorter words (ideally up to two syllables).
  6. Call to action
    It would be pretty silly to spend hours crafting a piece of copy only to forget to include a call to action. This is what gets you sales. In your CTA you need to ask your reader to do something, such as ‘visit our website’, ‘browse our online shop’, ‘download our free ebook’ or ‘sign up to our newsletter’. Anything you can offer your reader (ideally for free) is another incentive for them to act.
  7. Edit, edit, edit…
    Great copy undergoes rounds and round of extensive editing and proofing. Not only do you want to avoid glaringly obvious spelling and grammar mistakes, which plant doubt in your readers’ minds, but you also want to ensure your copy is as fluid, inspiring, engaging and seamless as possible.

A lot of time goes into crafting great copy that gets results. Writing your own is cheaper in the short term, but it can cost you big business if errors and bad writing put off your customers.

If you want to keep your time free to run your business in the best way possible, why not hire a copywriter to write your next webpage, flyer or job advertisement? I can take the hassle off your hands and save you time. Contact me today for a free and informal consultation.

How to write your ideal customer profile

If you’re just starting out your copywriting business, it’s a good idea to write an ideal customer profile which helps you define whose business you want to attract.

Copywriters usually offer a b2b service. Since that ideal ‘customer’ is actually another business, your profile should be built around your perfect imaginary business client.

There’s no special formula to writing your ideal customer profile, but here are some questions you can ask yourself to get started.

  1. Describe what you are selling as though to a child.
  2. Do you have any USPs?
  3. Who might benefit from your particular skills? Think about businesses in a certain industry you might have expertise in, your local area, or perhaps even certain members of the public such as educational providers, academics or students.
  4. Can you define a single ideal client? Do you have any conflictions between businesses? If so, write up the pros and cons of each and think about which business would benefit you most. Narrow down your profile to suit them.
  5. What are the benefits for them of using your product?
  6. What do they sell?
  7. Is their product considered a luxury or a necessity?
  8. If a luxury, how would you encourage their potential customers to part with their money? If a necessity, how can you make their product exciting, new and tempting?
  9. Does this business overlap a couple of industries – could it lead to more contacts?
  10. What scale is this business? How many people do they employ? Do they make a modest or a healthy profit?
  11. Does this business need you? Or do they likely already have a marketing department or not realistically have a budget to accommodate hiring a copywriter? How could you tailor your services to their needs and budget?
  12. What are their potential content needs?
  13. What problems does this business face now and in the future? Consider issues such as the economy, skills shortages, changes to the law, environmental pressures, an aging customer base.
  14. How can your skills help them overcome these problems?
  15. What are the benefits for you of working with this business?
  16. Where are they located (what area of the country and are the in the town centre or on the outskirts)?
  17. Describe that business’ ideal customer (remember, your income depends on appealing to their customers’ needs). Are they male/female, what is their age, why do they use this product, where do they live, what is their income?
  18. Think of people you know that might buy from this business.
  19. How long has this company been in business? Are they new and fresh or do they have heritage you can play on?
  20. Are they selling a contemporary service which appeals to a younger audience or a traditional product with an older demographic?
  21. How do they promote themselves and communicate with their customers?
  22. What kind of language do they use?
  23. What are the business’ values? Is it being cutting edge, is it providing a service no one else can, is it providing quality for money?
  24. Can your content help them reach new audiences?
  25. Is there an angle to this business that interests you? Such as its ethical policy, its affiliations, its work in the community. These all make great narratives for copy and press releases.

There are plenty more questions you can ask yourself, and if you wish you can begin another thread relating directly to that business’ customers.

However, you don’t want to get in too deep, but the more you begin to narrow down your ideal customer, the closer you will be to spotting the companies that could use your skills. Once you can show you are close in tone of voice and ideals, you will be in a firm position when you begin approaching these businesses for work.

How to get your first copywriting clients

When you start copywriting, getting your first clients can seem like a daunting task.

After all, you’re putting yourself out there where plenty have been before. So what makes you different? That’s an important question to answer as soon as you can because it is what will help define and sell your services.

However, answering that at the start of your career – when you just need a little experience – is probably impossible. You won’t know what you enjoy writing about, and what you’re good at writing about, until you start.

So here are some tips to help you.

  1. Join a content mill

Yes, they’re woefully underpaid. But if you have zero experience and can afford to spend a few months working for next to nothing, then it’s a good idea. I wrote about content mills in a previous post, so I recommend reading that first.

  1. Tap up your contacts

LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Google+… all these avenues are reeling with potential clients. Get your CV up to scratch and delete those personal photos. Now start linking to your blog posts/articles regularly and make it known you’re looking for new clients.

Former companies you’ve worked for might also be willing to offer you a job writing the odd piece of copy for them. If you worked there for a while, showed real initiative and left on good terms, why not drop an email to your ex-boss asking if they need someone who knows the business to write a press release?

  1. Scour the internet

You need to spend a lot of hours scouring the internet, so get good at thinking up search terms that can pinpoint you to a repository of freelance jobs. Some job board sites include Work in Startups, Network Freelance, Blogging Pro and Glassdoor. Small-scale publishers, Gum Tree or Student Gems (which you can use if you’ve graduated within the last 3 years) are also great unknown places. You’d be surprised how many businesses list their odd copywriting jobs on there.

  1. Networking events

Search your local area for groups of likeminded people and their latest talks or events. Or groups of professionals in an industry that you want to start writing for. MeetUp is a great site to show you what relevant groups are getting together and holding events around you. Go armed with business cards and the intention to meet as many people as possible to spread your word.

  1. Send out a press release

The media is a great way to get your message across, but the press will only publish your release if it is relevant and interesting. The fact that you’ve gone into self-employment isn’t exactly newsworthy. But perhaps your new job is a million miles from what you used to do. Or maybe you worked in a particular industry for ten years, making you something of a specialist? A magazine in that industry might be interested in publishing your release.

Other angles include offering an incentive, such as money off for new customers or a free trial for the first 5 local businesses who get in touch. Make sure it’s well-written and concise before sending it to local press, trade press and relevant bloggers.

  1. Send out a sales letter

Do you live and work in an area with plenty of independent businesses? They too have a product to sell, and they need help doing that. Craft the perfect sales letter and send it to a list of say 50 businesses. Remember to follow up a week or two later, and try to do it in a memorable way so that it doesn’t get lobbed out with the junk mail, as per this example!

  1. Leave a trail

You’d be surprised by the effect of simply dropping information about yourself. Eventually, someone will call. Physically, a trail might be business cards you leave in venues, pin to noticeboards and hand out at networking events.

Online, this trail could be profiles you set up with different websites. Consider posting a profile on freelance bidding sites such as Elance and Freelancer with links back to you (although I wouldn’t use these sites to get your actual first job). Social media, online copywriting networks and portfolio websites – the more, the better. Try to keep them up to date with your experience and contact details. That is if you can remember where you’ve dropped all your crumbs!

  1. Go free

I know, I know, you need to eat! But if you’ve tried all 7 steps (and I mean really, really tried) and still have no joy? Then find a few worthy causes in your area. Charities, community groups, people who need your services but can’t necessarily afford them. Be honest and say you’re looking for exposure and experience. Offer to write them the occasional blog post, an advert or press release (for free) and you’re on your way to building your portfolio.

You can bet they will tell everyone they know because good deeds do not go unremarked in this day and age! They might even find their own way to reward you. Cake, anyone?

Finding your first copywriting client isn’t the easiest thing, but it’s so rewarding when it works.

How did I do it? A combination of content mills while studying, writing for my old employer, landing a job through Student Gems and writing for free for many publications. But it takes time, especially if you’re not going full-time freelance straight away.

But remember. What many copywriters don’t tell you is that there is also no definite end point. We are all – me included – still on the journey to gaining new and more diverse clients. So it’s important to regularly target new clients through these methods, otherwise your business will stall.

Have you found a better way to land your first copywriting client? Send me a message or leave a comment and let us know how.

 

How to write a business strategy

Writing a business and marketing strategy when you’re a freelance copywriter might sound overwhelming. It might even sound unnecessary. Believe me, it is both simple and necessary!

Why do you need a business strategy? Because with the best intents and purposes, getting your foot on the copywriting ladder can be a bit difficult.

To make the best impact and not become dispirited, it’s good to implement several different tactics at once. Having a plan will help you stand back, look at the overall direction you want to head in, and start moving.

Before we begin

Jot down all your ideas in a notepad for establishing your routine and marketing your services. Once you’ve got an outline, you can type them up in Word.

There’s no set formula but I use a basic table with 3 columns (first column for publications/activities; second for detail; third for deadlines). You can tweak what I suggest to make it work for you and your business – that’s fine!

Content

Your content is the most important thing to your business. But writing to promote your own cause when you’re probably not being ‘paid’ for it can make you likely to waver. By creating a regular plan detailing which days you write for what publications makes it much more likely you’ll stick to it.

Make a table with three columns. In the first, list publications you write for and then list those you would like to write for (there’s a really good article here about planning to approach new publications). In the next column you can go into more detail such as genres/article types. In the final column list the timeframe, such as when you will publish this content or, if you plan to approach a new publication, the deadline you will set to do that by.

Remember, by publications and businesses I mean those you write for under your own name. This plan is about getting your name out there – not any clients that pay you to write their articles anonymously. At present you might only be writing for your blog. Look for websites that take contributions. Even if it’s unpaid, you’ll be getting your name out there and earning lots of experience.

Digital activity and social media

This includes promoting your articles through social media and e-newsletters etc. On your table, detail which digital avenues you work with (e.g. Reddit, LinkedIn, Google+, Facebook, Twitter, your online portfolio…) and next to each one write the days of the week you will promote certain links/campaigns/others’ posts through these avenues.

Try to have something to promote each day (Mon-Fri). For the days when you don’t have original content of your own, ensure you’re reading others’ work and retweeting/sharing. This earns followers and you can highlight the causes/topics you’re interested in.

Remember to use the social media ‘forum’ with respect: interact with other users and post observations. You could even start a regular segment such as your favourite blog or app of the week that you always run on a Friday. It is more engaging for your followers than merely seeing a series of links coming from your account!

And what about starting a monthly e-newsletter through your website? Setting one up is easy with free tools like MailChimp and gives you something free to ‘sell’ to your followers. You can use it to collate your articles from various different publications or even entice followers with articles solely published in your newsletter. Plus you can update your followers with tips, news and offers.

Advertising and promotion

Your copywriting is still a business that can benefit from promotion and advertising. This encompasses print/digital ads, direct mail, sending out a press release

Think about who needs your service. It’ll mostly be other businesses, so where might they find out about you? In your table, list possible publications (e.g. trade magazines, local paper) to advertise in or approach with a press release, as well as businesses you could approach directly with a sales letter, etc.

Then spend an afternoon getting quotes, contacts and artwork deadlines. If you’re going to attend networking events or conferences you’ll need business cards. These are also useful for dropping off in venues where customers can pick them up, such as restaurants, exhibition centres and libraries.

Events

Freelancing can also be a lonely business, so it’s refreshing to make a network of contacts through digital or in-person events. Scour Google for virtual conferences and webinars, and sign up to copywriting websites such as the Pro Copywriter’s Network and Copyblogger, a great way to get information on events. Hootsuite also often has virtual learning sessions helping you learn while connecting with others in your field.

Physical events are also ideal to get you out of the house. A site like Meet Up can help you discover what’s going on in your area that ties in with your interests. List these events under the first column in your table including any dates and activity/materials you want to have completed (i.e. business cards) in advance of them.

Bringing it together

You’ll notice how each field begins to overlap. This is good because you’re drawing connections between your activities. So long as all activities have the same end goal – to bring you more business – they will strengthen each other and, in turn, your brand. It also helps when setting yourself deadlines since one thing usually depends on another.

Next is buying or creating a calendar in Word. Detail everything (so make sure it’s a biggie!). Jot down the days you’re writing for which publications. Then the days you’ll spend devoted to finding new followers, for example, followed by the days you have any events, as well as print deadlines. And so on…

Tip: Use colour-coded keys and back up your calendar with a simple Excel planner like these templates from Hootsuite for more in-depth info on what you’ll be writing each week. That way your main calendar remains like an easy-to-read overview.

From here

Now your strategy is all typed up, scheduled and ready to go, it’s time to implement it. Write down the immediate action points that have arisen from your plan. Use these to inform your workload for the next week or two, to ensure you meet your deadlines.

Don’t forget that your business strategy will evolve over time and regularly need updating.  Depending on how quickly you work, set aside time to update it – every month…or three – whatever helps it stay relevant and progressive for your business.

Finally, good luck! If you have any questions, drop me a comment, I’d be glad to try and answer them.

Next week: I’ll show you how to find your first copywriting clients

Buzzwords – a rule to be broken?

I recently tweeted about an interesting programme I happened to catch on BBC Radio 4. The programme was Word of Mouth – a weekly look at language use in modern life.

This week, the topic was ‘PR: How Not to Do It’. It focussed on the prevalence of buzzwords throughout history and how these can actually work against you.

All very well for those at the top of their game, I thought, but how does that help aspiring marketeers?

Don’t get me wrong, I know buzzwords can be as annoying as corporate speak. They don’t mean anything – or rather they are often employed to mean the opposite of what they actually mean – and they become overused.

Yet when you attend marketing days or copywriting courses, you are encouraged to use buzzwords. In fact, we are often presented with a list that we should, on pain of death, get into our copy lest it never see the light of day.

Here are just a few:

New

Awesome Hot

Free

Epic
(and epic fail)

Mashup

Upsell

Millennial

Amazing

Solutions Issues

Wellness

And if you look at successful headlines, they clearly work. They wouldn’t be buzzwords if they didn’t have some special power would they? And in case you were wondering, yes buzzword itself is a buzzword!

In the discussion, Hamish Thompson, MD at Houston PR, suggests that the best way to avoid these words is to take your advertising concept in a different direction, perhaps by looking at a campaign backwards.

In his example, he cites a company who decided that instead of selling drills, they sell holes. He also mentions a Virgin Life Insurance ad he worked on, where instead of selling policies front ways (‘buy this in case you die’), they twisted it around and played up the comical un-thought-of aspect (‘we’ll cover you in the event of attack by Dalek’).

This works. This is clever. And a lot of companies could probably be persuaded to go down that route.

However, he also cited an example of a press release he has to write annually for the Boring Conference. He loves this task, because he gets to take an ironic stance and writes the most boring press release he can.

But this sounded alarm bells for me. While that would certainly fire up journalists (and don’t forget, when you’re writing a PR, they are your audience) I think that a client has to be on the same wavelength as you in order to be OK with what they’re paying you for! My fear is that many clients know what they want: it’s what they see in viral headlines, the smack-you-in-the-face lies (and pics) we read all the time, lurking in those clickbait ads at the bottom of any web article.

My point is, many clients aren’t necessarily ‘up for’ subtlety and irony.

It seemed to me as though Hamish’s suggestion is what top-of-their-game marketeers should be doing. But unfortunately, I don’t know if too many start-up freelancers would be brave enough to take the risk for fear of it falling on deaf ears.

Ultimately, I think buzzwords still have a place in the right context for luring people in – but don’t get complacent. Don’t substitute creativity for buzzwords. Because eventually, buzzwords die off. You know as well as I do that when a headline starts ‘You won’t believe…’ or ‘5 things you need to know about…’, you’re probably not going to click. It’s viral fodder that will make your computer run slow, spread pop-ups everywhere, and make you wish you’d never wasted the time.

I suppose my tip is: use your judgement. Pay attention to the client’s brief. If they’re open to seeing what you can do, then why not pitch them a few off-the-wall ideas in amongst a few safe strategies? Every now and then it will pay to take a chance, even if it’s just in content you’re publishing on your blog or pro bono. It’ll be good experience for you and your portfolio, and you’ll have more credibility when you pitch something similar in future.

 

9 tips to organise your time

If you’ve just turned freelance, managing your own workload after being office-bound can be scary. Here’s 9 tips to organise your time:

  1. Make lists

Start by jotting down everything you need to do and put it in priority order. That includes both business and personal engagements. The bonus of working from home is being able to shuffle your day. Making lists helps you identify the pockets of time when you will be able to work at your best.

  1. Have a system

Whether that’s Outlook, your phone’s calendar, a scribbled timetable in a notebook or a project management web platform like Trello – break down the day into sections so you literally have an hourly itinerary.

  1. Eat a frog

Mark Twain once wrote, “If you eat a frog first thing in the morning that will probably be the worst thing you do all day.”

Brian Tracy took this idea and wrote a book on how to stop procrastinating – by eating a frog (that thing you’ve been putting off) first thing. That email you’ve been putting off or all those invoices you’ve been meaning to input… Simply set aside an hour and get them all done together. Then you can clear those reminders off your phone and get on with the day!

  1. Variety is the spice of life

Mix up your schedule. Plan time for your own blog activities, any distance-learning courses, exercise, and hobbies etc. I break the day into 2 or 3-hour slots and ensure there is variety throughout the day so that my work doesn’t suffer. Try to schedule time for that big project that’s been on the back burner. If you don’t make a start now, when will you? Spending just one hour a week on it will help you feel more in control.

  1. Take a day off!

Always try to keep 2 days a week free. Freelancers are notorious for working non-stop. When I first started freelancing, I worked almost non-stop for 3 months. Now when work comes in I negotiate deadlines with the client accounting for the fact that I always take Saturday and Sunday for myself.

  1. Take stock

Use the end of the working week to take stock of your progress and what you’re going to achieve next week. I do this on Friday evening. It helps wind things up nicely and means I don’t stress over the weekend because I already have a well thought out POA for Monday. Goals to think about might include scheduling time for that ongoing project or approaching a new publication/client.

  1. Change the scenery

For all its perks, working from home can turn you into a hermit. Why not pinpoint one or two days a week to work outside of the house? I work in cafes and occasionally pubs (only toward the end of the day!) This helps remind you that you’re still a functioning member of society and can provide a valuable source of inspiration.

  1. Use affirmations

Get distracted easily? Devise an affirmation that you can tell yourself every time you sit down to work. It might sound lame but this actually works.

If you tell yourself you’re going to work through without being distracted in order to maximise your time, it acts as an instruction to your brain. When you find yourself absent-mindedly reaching for the internet browser, repeat the affirmation and get back to the job in hand. There’ll be plenty of time for browsing after you’re done.

  1. Get out

If the ideas still aren’t flowing or you find yourself distracted regularly, it’s probably a sign to take a break. Get outside and take a walk round the park, or if it’s raining bake a cake. Do something to take your mind off it. When you come back you’ll be refreshed – it works!

Got your own tips for organising your time effectively while freelancing? Post a comment and share with the world!