Buzzwords – a rule to be broken?

I recently tweeted about an interesting programme I happened to catch on BBC Radio 4. The programme was Word of Mouth – a weekly look at language use in modern life.

This week, the topic was ‘PR: How Not to Do It’. It focussed on the prevalence of buzzwords throughout history and how these can actually work against you.

All very well for those at the top of their game, I thought, but how does that help aspiring marketeers?

Don’t get me wrong, I know buzzwords can be as annoying as corporate speak. They don’t mean anything – or rather they are often employed to mean the opposite of what they actually mean – and they become overused.

Yet when you attend marketing days or copywriting courses, you are encouraged to use buzzwords. In fact, we are often presented with a list that we should, on pain of death, get into our copy lest it never see the light of day.

Here are just a few:

New

Awesome Hot

Free

Epic
(and epic fail)

Mashup

Upsell

Millennial

Amazing

Solutions Issues

Wellness

And if you look at successful headlines, they clearly work. They wouldn’t be buzzwords if they didn’t have some special power would they? And in case you were wondering, yes buzzword itself is a buzzword!

In the discussion, Hamish Thompson, MD at Houston PR, suggests that the best way to avoid these words is to take your advertising concept in a different direction, perhaps by looking at a campaign backwards.

In his example, he cites a company who decided that instead of selling drills, they sell holes. He also mentions a Virgin Life Insurance ad he worked on, where instead of selling policies front ways (‘buy this in case you die’), they twisted it around and played up the comical un-thought-of aspect (‘we’ll cover you in the event of attack by Dalek’).

This works. This is clever. And a lot of companies could probably be persuaded to go down that route.

However, he also cited an example of a press release he has to write annually for the Boring Conference. He loves this task, because he gets to take an ironic stance and writes the most boring press release he can.

But this sounded alarm bells for me. While that would certainly fire up journalists (and don’t forget, when you’re writing a PR, they are your audience) I think that a client has to be on the same wavelength as you in order to be OK with what they’re paying you for! My fear is that many clients know what they want: it’s what they see in viral headlines, the smack-you-in-the-face lies (and pics) we read all the time, lurking in those clickbait ads at the bottom of any web article.

My point is, many clients aren’t necessarily ‘up for’ subtlety and irony.

It seemed to me as though Hamish’s suggestion is what top-of-their-game marketeers should be doing. But unfortunately, I don’t know if too many start-up freelancers would be brave enough to take the risk for fear of it falling on deaf ears.

Ultimately, I think buzzwords still have a place in the right context for luring people in – but don’t get complacent. Don’t substitute creativity for buzzwords. Because eventually, buzzwords die off. You know as well as I do that when a headline starts ‘You won’t believe…’ or ‘5 things you need to know about…’, you’re probably not going to click. It’s viral fodder that will make your computer run slow, spread pop-ups everywhere, and make you wish you’d never wasted the time.

I suppose my tip is: use your judgement. Pay attention to the client’s brief. If they’re open to seeing what you can do, then why not pitch them a few off-the-wall ideas in amongst a few safe strategies? Every now and then it will pay to take a chance, even if it’s just in content you’re publishing on your blog or pro bono. It’ll be good experience for you and your portfolio, and you’ll have more credibility when you pitch something similar in future.

 

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9 tips to organise your time

If you’ve just turned freelance, managing your own workload after being office-bound can be scary. Here’s 9 tips to organise your time:

  1. Make lists

Start by jotting down everything you need to do and put it in priority order. That includes both business and personal engagements. The bonus of working from home is being able to shuffle your day. Making lists helps you identify the pockets of time when you will be able to work at your best.

  1. Have a system

Whether that’s Outlook, your phone’s calendar, a scribbled timetable in a notebook or a project management web platform like Trello – break down the day into sections so you literally have an hourly itinerary.

  1. Eat a frog

Mark Twain once wrote, “If you eat a frog first thing in the morning that will probably be the worst thing you do all day.”

Brian Tracy took this idea and wrote a book on how to stop procrastinating – by eating a frog (that thing you’ve been putting off) first thing. That email you’ve been putting off or all those invoices you’ve been meaning to input… Simply set aside an hour and get them all done together. Then you can clear those reminders off your phone and get on with the day!

  1. Variety is the spice of life

Mix up your schedule. Plan time for your own blog activities, any distance-learning courses, exercise, and hobbies etc. I break the day into 2 or 3-hour slots and ensure there is variety throughout the day so that my work doesn’t suffer. Try to schedule time for that big project that’s been on the back burner. If you don’t make a start now, when will you? Spending just one hour a week on it will help you feel more in control.

  1. Take a day off!

Always try to keep 2 days a week free. Freelancers are notorious for working non-stop. When I first started freelancing, I worked almost non-stop for 3 months. Now when work comes in I negotiate deadlines with the client accounting for the fact that I always take Saturday and Sunday for myself.

  1. Take stock

Use the end of the working week to take stock of your progress and what you’re going to achieve next week. I do this on Friday evening. It helps wind things up nicely and means I don’t stress over the weekend because I already have a well thought out POA for Monday. Goals to think about might include scheduling time for that ongoing project or approaching a new publication/client.

  1. Change the scenery

For all its perks, working from home can turn you into a hermit. Why not pinpoint one or two days a week to work outside of the house? I work in cafes and occasionally pubs (only toward the end of the day!) This helps remind you that you’re still a functioning member of society and can provide a valuable source of inspiration.

  1. Use affirmations

Get distracted easily? Devise an affirmation that you can tell yourself every time you sit down to work. It might sound lame but this actually works.

If you tell yourself you’re going to work through without being distracted in order to maximise your time, it acts as an instruction to your brain. When you find yourself absent-mindedly reaching for the internet browser, repeat the affirmation and get back to the job in hand. There’ll be plenty of time for browsing after you’re done.

  1. Get out

If the ideas still aren’t flowing or you find yourself distracted regularly, it’s probably a sign to take a break. Get outside and take a walk round the park, or if it’s raining bake a cake. Do something to take your mind off it. When you come back you’ll be refreshed – it works!

Got your own tips for organising your time effectively while freelancing? Post a comment and share with the world!

 

Why you need a copywriter

I expect you’ve heard this quite a lot. The sales letter from the eager copywriter, the marketing agency that assures you your business will fail without their services.

And I know your concern.

The way the economy is, you need to keep costs down. But your business also needs content – it needs words – otherwise how will anyone new know you exist?

I’ll cut to the chase.

There are 3 reasons you need a copywriter

  1. To create a sense of need in the reader
  2. To inspire them to buy into your product
  3. To deliver you repeat custom

It really is that simple.

Some businesses write their own copy, but this can be counter-productive. Copywriters are constantly analysing marketing strategy to see what works. Might you be turning your customers off without even realising? Or worse, not communicating with them at all?

It takes a lot of time to write content that is unique, error-free and interesting. Often it takes an outsider like me to see the simplest way of getting your message across.

But you can already write. Right?

It’s not just about being able to write. Hiring a copywriter is about making a firm decision for your business. You are deciding to hire a professional who has the time, knowledge and skill to craft unique and engaging content specifically for you.

Choosing to employ a copywriter is about finding
– Someone who knows what works and what doesn’t
– Someone who can eliminate errors
– Someone who can use a voice your customers will relate to
– Someone who will ensure your business stands out from the crowd

And while they’re doing that, you can spend your time running your business. That’s the way it should be.

You can contact me when you feel the time is right. Just drop me an e-mail. I’ll be here, cracking on with that paperwork in the corner until then. I look forward to hearing from you.

Has gender marketing had its day?

Are women passive and girly? Are men all about their muscles? Of course not. But that’s not what most product marketing tells us.

For a long time it was ‘acceptable’ to gender products in order to sell them. But this has just served to perpetuate the myths we are still trying to break free of – ultimately, that men and women act in wholly different ways and therefore must want, need and be sold different things.

A little story
I recently bought a bottle of Radox Muscle Therapy, my usual bubble bath of choice. I picked it up, paid for it, took it home without a thought. It’s only when I ran the bath later that evening that I realised Radox Muscle Therapy bubble bath is now labelled for ‘MEN’.

Just a matter of months ago, this same bubble bath was safe for use by all sexes. But I – as the dumb consumer that marketers think I am – can only assume they’ve just discovered it contains ‘man ingredients’. You know, the kind that only work on men. It would be wasted on women – you have to be a man to enjoy it!

But what is the assumption behind this seemingly innocuous labelling? That only men use their muscles? Only men get back pain or aching legs? I wonder if they’ve ever heard that women lift stuff too? Or of period pain and restless legs syndrome?

I don’t need to make my point – you already know what it is. But many marketers don’t.

Gender marketing: a double-edge blade
When they market products, many marketers still employ assumptions about gender and sex to sell them. Whether it’s pink, flowery bicycles and globes for girls, or superman costumes and camouflage play tents for boys. And if that fails, they just tell you who it’s for, as in the case of many toiletries products. Just so there’s no ambiguities and everyone stays in their rightful place.

These marketers think that by labelling products appropriately – even though it is totally inappropriate to exclude one sex from a unisex product – they’re attracting a newer audience or targeting their marketing. But here’s the thing. Often, they’re not. Instead, they’re turning off a whole lot of other consumers and risk making them feel belittled, alienated, angry and not listened to. And if those consumers you’re putting off are female, you might just end up losing out.

Women buy
Women account for 85% of all purchases made. They might be buying for themselves or they might just as frequently be buying for the men in their life – so marketers need to have the woman in mind when they sell.

That doesn’t just mean with flowers and fancy décor. Target marketing is about more than just fluff – and sex and gender for that matter; it’s about appealing to your customer’s ideals and values. If you take the time to find out what matters to your consumer, rather than making assumptions, and distilling those values into your marketing, then your message will be picked up.

The paradox
These days we know gender stereotypes are bunkum; we live our lives to the full doing all kinds of different jobs and activities that blur the boundaries of gender and sex. But advertising largely fails to acknowledge that. In a world much more open, we actually seem to be seeing more gendered marketing. It doesn’t make sense.

Women are more likely to buy products aimed at men, more so than men will buy those aimed at women. Therefore, gendering products can work against marketers, who are actually narrowing the field of what men, and some women, will go for. If unisex products were marketed at all sexes, then the audience base becomes wider. We also have to ask ourselves whether women sometimes buy products aimed at men because this is the only way of getting what they want.

How to get what you want
When I went back to the supermarket and looked at all those Radox bubble baths lined up, I noticed something. Only one was labelled for men (Muscle Therapy), while the others had titles such as ‘feel pampered’, ‘feel heavenly’, ‘feel blissful’, ‘feel enchanted’. There was also a Muscle Soak option – I suppose the passive woman’s version of the more intensive, active and energised Muscle Therapy, which is for ‘MEN’, as we now know. Despite the fact that all baths entail the passive act of simply ‘soaking’.

None of the other bottles were labelled for women. But I could tell, what with all the pastel pinks, peaches and innocent, creamy white palettes – and of course the flowers adorning the labels. The men’s Muscle Therapy bottle, however, was angsty black and red, with a label signifying something more akin to the bubbling inferno of hell than a relaxing bath. Of course, men don’t want their bath time to be relaxing, but rather a dip into hell and back. They want the hard stuff.

Just as the statistics state, in order to get what I want I will still buy Muscle Therapy bubble bath, even though it’s now for ‘MEN’. Mostly, I just like the product, but I also refuse to be told I must defer to a more feminine alternative.

Marketers – break the mould!
Gendered marketing seems wholly backward in a time when we are more than ever aware of marketing tactics, more connected, and the already-blurred divide between the sexes is being shattered day by day.

Advertisers and marketers with the most acclaim are those who recognise what their consumers want, but also show the reality of modern culture – whether that’s the recent Match.com advert with two kissing lesbians (albeit in a sexualised way) or the Guinness ‘Never Alone’ advert with gay rugby player Gareth Thomas.

When I see a pink this or that for females and a camouflage alternative for males, I despair. Because it is this lazy, old-fashioned stereotyping that makes it harder for the people out there who don’t conform. And that, in one way or another, is all of us.

At worst, gendered marketing of unisex products is offensive, at best it’s just redundant.

Neglect social media at your peril

If you’re not convinced social media is important for your business – then this blog post is for you.

I’ve worked with clients who see social media as a last resort. They see it as something that, if they use it almost sparingly, will stand them in good stead against the hordes of online competition.

This just isn’t the case.

Social media is your child

Time consuming as it is, social media is not just something that happens once, like updating your virus protection. Instead, it’s like a child, which needs constant attention and nourishment in order to grow.

Starting with the basics, key social media sites Facebook and Twitter are crucial for getting news, offers and new products out there. They’re important as a way to send traffic (people) to your blog and website.

To put it bluntly – you need them to sell your stuff.

Don’t lose out to the competition

You might think it takes a lot of effort to write a blog post once or twice a month and post it to your blog and social media accounts. And it does.

But I hate to tell you that that alone won’t do anything for your business. If you’re putting money and time aside for that, you might as well not bother.

With social media, it’s all or nothing. You’re up against big businesses who have a whole marketing department devoted to blogging, tweeting, liking and sharing all day, all week, all month long.

If you’re not posting on your blog at least once a week and checking your social media at least twice a day (to make friends, respond to queries and post relevant content), you’ll never be part of the online conversation that your customers are.

What can you do?

There are several online tools that make this easier for independent businesses. These include the scheduling function on several blog hosting sites, including WordPress.

Hootsuite is another great tool which allows you to manage up to three accounts for free. This way you can schedule tweets or posts and respond to messages, likes, retweets and mentions all from one platform.

Finding the time

The best way to do this is to manage your time accordingly. Put aside one day a week where you write as many blog posts and schedule as many social media tweets as you can.

However. This doesn’t replace being constantly engaged with your online customer base.

You should think as social media in the same way you would a shop front. It is a virtual high street. You need to keep rotating products, highlights and offers in your social media window in order to attract people inside.

I can help

It’s not easy doing this yourself, but a freelance copywriter or marketing consultant can help. I have worked with several clients and businesses to write their blog posts and promote them online.

Using a professional takes care of the hassle of writing engaging and keyword-rich copy. After all, we are trained and experienced in how to do this.

We can even monitor your accounts for you, ensuring your online customers are being looked after in the same way a shopkeeper would.

Think about it for a second

In real life, you wouldn’t shut your cupcake business on National Cupcake Day. Or leave your customers to wander around your shop and put money on the counter without any interaction with an employee, would you?

Who would answer their questions? Who would make sure they knew about the latest offers? Who would ensure they could find everything they needed?

81% of people research their purchase online before they buy. That includes high street shoppers. If you neglect that 81%, you neglect them at your peril.

I can work with you on your blog and online needs to ensure your business works as hard as you do. So take the next step for your business today and contact me now to get started.